spry publishing

patient support

American Diabetes Alert Day: Get Tested!

blood_glucose_samples

.

by Maddy Barnes

.

If you follow this blog regularly, you may be knowledgeable on some of the struggles that come with a diabetes diagnosis. If you are not a person with diabetes, you may be thankful that these struggles do not directly affect your life. Unfortunately, however, an estimated seven million Americans are currently living with diabetes without even knowing that they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, putting them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined as having elevated blood glucose levels, and this is part of what makes American Diabetes Alert Day so important.

.

So, what is American Diabetes Alert Day, you may ask? As defined by the American Diabetes Association, “American Diabetes Association Alert Day is a one-day ‘wake-up call’ asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.” Unfortunately, for those who are considered to have “prediabetes,” diagnosis often comes seven to ten years after the onset of the disease, after disabling and even deadly complications have already taken place. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical to successful treatment and delaying or preventing some of its complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation, and death.

.

The American Diabetes Association lists several different ways to diagnose diabetes, with descriptions of each test summarized on their website . Essentially, each test usually needs to be repeated a second time to diagnose diabetes. Testing should take place within a healthcare setting, and if your doctor determines that your blood glucose level is very high, or if you have classic symptoms of high blood glucose in addition to one positive test, he or she may not require a second test for a diabetes diagnosis.

.

Prediabetes can be difficult to recognize because it often has few obvious physical symptoms. Therefore, rather than look for physical signs, one should consider risk factors such as obesity, sedentary lifestyle, family history of diabetes, and age.

.

Because there are not many symptoms associated with prediabetes, when it blossoms into type 2 diabetes, many individuals are unaware that they have a very serious disease. Lawrence Barker, PhD, Associate Director for Science in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, explains on Diabetes in Control that “individuals with type 2 diabetes can go years without exhibiting outward symptoms, and because of that, just as with prediabetes, it is important for a person to know the risk factors for developing the disease.” The following are some of the most common risk factors for prediabetes:

.

• Fat distribution
• Inactivity
• Family history
• Being of Hispanic, African-American, Asian, or American Indian descent
• Being over the age of 45
• Having developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy

.

diabetes_blue_marker

.

The Mayo Clinic also lists some common physical symptoms to be aware of that may be associated with prediabetes, such as excessive thirst and increased urination, fatigue, weight loss, and blurred vision.

.

Spry author Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, knows the importance of managing diabetes, especially after diagnosis. Within his book Until There Is A Cure, he touches on the benefits that managing diabetes can bring to the life of someone living with the disease:

.

“Whether you’ve had diabetes for a month or a millennium, you know that managing it takes work. There are sacrifices to be made, expenses involved, and mental and physical energy that you’d probably rather use on something a bit more fun. If you’re going to put the work in, you deserve to get something for it. Here’s a quick overview of what you stand to gain:

.

• Increased energy
• More restful sleep
• Improved physical performance
• Appetite reduction
• Brain power
• Stable moods/emotions
• Fewer sick days
• Healthier skin and gums
• Personal safety
• Predictable periods”

.

If these potential advantages are not incentive enough to take a Diabetes Risk Test, perhaps the long-term benefits are. As stated previously, blindly living with prediabetes for an extended period of time can have catastrophic consequences. Scheiner mentions some of the long-term benefits of successfully managing diabetes in Until There Is A Cure:

.

“Glucose levels that are too high over a period of many years cause damage to virtually every important system of the body. Major long-term multi-center research projects have shown that tight glucose control reduces the risk on many long-term health problems. There are no guarantees, but odds are that if you manage your diabetes well, you can look forward to the following:

.

• Healthy eyes
• Healthy kidneys
• Ample circulation
• Proper nerve function
• Fit feet
• A sound mind
• Flexible joints
• Good mental health”

.

The bottom line is that taking a Diabetes Risk Test is important for everyone, even those who may not have the symptoms or risk factors listed above. If you are diagnosed with either prediabetes or diabetes, early diagnosis is crucial to management of the disease and staying healthy. Click here to read more about diabetes awareness and how to get involved with a diabetes support group.

.

Maddy Barnes joined the Spry Wellness Blog as a contributor in 2013. She is currently working to obtain an undergraduate degree in English and Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and hopes to pursue a career in public relations or publishing after graduation.

.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Heart framing on woman chest with pink badge to support breast c

.

By Katherine Plumhoff with Barrie Cassileth, PhD

.

If you’ve ventured outside of your home or even just turned on the TV in the last few weeks, you’ve probably seen people wearing pink at the grocery store, in the school parking lot, and on the football field. The ribbons, the cleats, the water bottles—pink is everywhere, which makes sense because October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

.

While some of the advocacy is controversial (see this article about how much of NFL pink merchandise sales actually go toward cancer research), bringing attention to the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women can’t be bad. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF).

.

The NBCF states that National Breast Cancer Awareness Month works to “promote breast cancer awareness, share information on the disease, and provide greater access to services.”

.

New Spry author Barrie Cassileth has similar goals in her new book, to be released next spring, called Survivorship: Living Well During and After Cancer. While her book addresses all cancers, not just breast cancer, its information about complementary therapies is certainly applicable to those dealing with breast cancer. Cassileth says the following about dealing with an initial cancer diagnosis:

.

“When facing cancer, it is true that some elements that may contribute to the final outcome are beyond control, but you can benefit tremendously by taking charge of those choices you do have. You can decide which doctors and hospitals to use. You can take an active and informed role as a partner in decisions about your treatment plan. You can choose to make lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, which improve health and well-being and survival.

.

Additionally, you can take advantage of various complementary (integrative) therapies that reduce physical and emotional symptoms along the way.”

.

In the United States, 220,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, and they have a multitude of treatment options open to them, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and hormone therapy. The National Breast Cancer Foundation stresses the importance of complementing medical care with nutrition and physical activity and says the following:

.

• “Taking care of yourself includes eating well and staying as active as you can.”
• “Do your best to eat the right amount of calories to maintain a good weight.”
• “Adequate protein can help to keep up your strength.”

.

Barrie Cassileth understands the health potential in food, too. The following excerpt from Survivorship gives a brief overview:

.

“What you eat matters. A simple, perhaps obvious fact, but one that is too frequently overlooked. There is little doubt that what we eat has an impact on our risk of diseases such as cancer, and on the progression of those diseases after diagnosis. The nature of this connection has been, and continues to be, the subject of much scientific research. Although we have a lot more to learn, certain guidelines are becoming well established.”

.

In the upcoming book, Cassileth walks readers through various studies citing the benefits of diets rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and low in fats. She offers suggestions for dietary guidelines and provides an overview of answers to questions such as “Should I change my diet? Should I gain or lose weight? What diet will help me lose weight? Would I benefit from taking a multivitamin or other dietary supplements? Do healing diets work, and if so, which is best?”

.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month hopes to increase knowledge of treatment options and availability, and a book such as Survivorship is a good resource for patients as they create their treatment plans to combat their breast cancer diagnosis.

.

Katherine Plumhoff joined the Spry Wellness Blog as a contributor in 2013. She is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in English and Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and hopes to work in publishing after graduation.

.

 

.


Accessible and Up-to-Date Guide to Prostate Cancer

Redefining Prostate Cancer

.

by Sally Feller

.

I’m excited to share that there’s a new resource available for prostate cancer patients that offers approachable and sound advice from three of the top doctors in the field. In Redefining Prostate Cancer: An Innovative Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment, doctors Steven Lamm, Herbert Lepor, and Dan Sperling combine their broad expertise in this comprehensive guide to prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. They aspire to help patients sort through all the research and technological advancements to clearly understand the options available to them.

.

Redefining Prostate Cancer gives men the information they need in order to intelligently discuss their treatment options with their healthcare team and find exactly what options are best for them.

.

“Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in men, but it’s also highly treatable. Most prostate cancers are found in early stages in men age 65 and older. The five-year survival rate for men diagnosed with early-stage localized (i.e., confined to the prostate) prostate cancer is 100%” (SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975–2009).

.

“It may sound as if the prostate pretty much takes care of itself and will let you know if there’s a problem by having your life revolve around urgently finding a bathroom. However, most men with early-stage prostate cancer have no symptoms, and prostate cancer is typically very slow growing compared to other cancers. It can take decades before a tumor grows large enough to be felt with a rectal exam or cause any noticeable problems.

.

… So how do we catch prostate changes early enough to treat them, without causing men undue stress and unnecessary procedures?” (from Redefining Prostate Cancer)

.

While prostate cancer seems like a “man’s problem,” it really goes deeper than that—it’s a couple’s problem. Men diagnosed with prostate cancer must weigh the pros and cons of each treatment option in relation to their personal lifestyle—their age, relationship status, overall health, and sexual activity. And it’s not just spouses and significant others who are affected, of course, but friends, children, and others who care for the man with the illness. There is no “one size fits all” treatment for prostate cancer.

.

Your intrepid guides through diagnosis and treatment discussion are Dr. Steven Lamm, the director of the Men’s Health Center at New York University Medical Center and a practicing internist; Dr. Herbert Lepor, one of the leading experts in the field of prostate cancer who is currently the Martin Spatz Chairman of the Department of Urology and the Director of the Smilow Comprehensive Prostate Cancer Center at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York; and Dr. Dan Sperling, the Medical Director at the Sperling Prostate Center, New York, NY, and a leading specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate tumors through magnetic resonance imaging and laser ablation procedures.

.

Redefining Prostate Cancer stands out as the go-to resource for newly diagnosed patients, as well as those curious about the recent controversy on the topic of PSA screening, because it’s comprehensive and up-to-date (delving into the most modern diagnostic and treatment technologies available), while remaining totally accessible and easy-to-understand for readers already inundated with all of the questions that arise after a positive diagnosis.

.

The doctors who wrote this book are passionate about sharing the most up-to-date information available with the men who need it, and their caring and understanding underlies all of the imparted research in the book. We encourage newly diagnosed men and their loved ones to pick up this book and to discuss treatment options today.

.

Sally Feller is the Manager, Publicity and Marketing, at Spry Publishing.

.

 

.


Banish Woes of the Chronically Disorganized

Banish Woes of the Chronically Disorganized: Experts Help People with Diabetes Manage Health and Lifestyle Needs with Aplomb

.

By Sally Feller

.

In case you haven’t heard already, we’re all busy people. Every day, we remind ourselves to tackle just one more thing that day. We find ourselves scrambling, searching for our keys while running out the door ten minutes later than originally planned. That can’t just be me, right?

.

People with diabetes must also add in one more giant thing to keep track of—their health. While forgetting your morning coffee on your way to work is annoying, it’s not a matter of life and death—if, on the flipside, people with diabetes find themselves in a bind without the nutrition and medicines they need, it can be life-threatening. Luckily, renowned certified diabetes educator Susan Weiner has combined her knowledge of diabetes, nutrition, and health with that of an organizing guru named Leslie Josel. Together, Susan and Leslie have created an organization guide specifically for people with diabetes and their caregivers. They tackle pantries, refrigerators, travel, home, office, and school. There’s even a special section for parents on how to make school for children with diabetes run seamlessly, as well as tips for planning for school trips, sleepovers, summer camps, and more.

.

In The Complete Diabetes Organizer: Your Guide to a Less Stressful and More Manageable Diabetes Life, Susan and Leslie offer tactics that empower people with diabetes to take charge of the daily maintenance and care of their diabetes. Tips included in the book are adaptable to all sorts of different lifestyles and needs and encourage readers to create a system that works for them. These organizational tips alleviate the stress caused by chronic disorganization and can also help readers save money by eliminating unnecessary food waste.

.

Each section includes multiple sample lists and planning exercises that are fully adaptable to the reader’s needs and everyday life. These worksheets can help jump-start those of us who are overwhelmed by disorganization and find the idea of tackling this issue daunting by offering small goals to help us improve our organization one step at a time.

.

“Managing [diabetes] can be daunting. The coauthors of this practical, interactive workbook—Susan Weiner, a dietitian, and Leslie Josel, a professional organizer—can help. The workbook covers setting goals, organizing supplies, and a ‘diabetes-friendly kitchen,’ managing diabetes at work … and at school … and more. For diabetics, disorganization can be devastating—even deadly. This book could be a lifesaver.”
—Peggy Brown, Newsday

.

Authors Susan Weiner and Leslie Josel are the perfect pair to create The Complete Diabetes Organizer. Susan’s vast experience as a diabetes educator and lecturer with a Master’s in Applied Physiology and Nutrition from Columbia University and Leslie’s work as an acclaimed authority on chronic disorganization and ADHD and Hoarding Specialist come together in this book to provide people with diabetes with a guide for tackling both their health and lifestyle needs.

.

Sally Feller is the Manager, Publicity and Marketing, at Spry Publishing.

.

 

.


Watch How to Create a Diabetes-Friendly Pantry

Living with Juvenile Arthritis—A Mother Reaches Out to Help Others

Kim_Miller_Web_Square

.

Author Kimberly Poston Miller contributes to Spry Publishing’s blog, elaborating on the events and emotions that prompted her to write a book.

.

Living with Juvenile Arthritis: A Parent’s Guide is the book I wish I had when our son was first diagnosed. There were many books out there about autoimmune disease or arthritis, but nothing that specifically related to the challenges that we would face as a family or all the things that juvenile arthritis (JA) would affect in our child’s life. The books I found were mostly medical-type publications, which were incredibly helpful, but they addressed the condition, not living with the disease, and that is the part where we needed the most help! When our second son was also diagnosed with JA, things went so much smoother because I had learned the ropes. I knew the language. I learned how to speak so the doctors would listen. I knew just what I should ask for in a 504 plan at school, and how to address friends and family who just didn’t “get it.” Adapting our day-to-day activities to adjust to our “new” challenges had become old hat, but as an active member of many online communities, I found that others were struggling just as we had.

.

Although online communities are an excellent source of information and tips from seasoned veterans, I thought it would be great to have a compiled resource all in one place … a go-to parent’s guide for all the things your doctor doesn’t tell you from how to travel with medically necessary liquids to dealing with Great Aunt Gertrude who is sure your child would be healed if only you would give them her special concoction three times a day. I also wanted to share the stories of other parents and children with different forms of juvenile arthritis, so that readers might be able to relate to a similar case. The severity and symptoms of juvenile arthritis can vary widely from case to case, which we have found even in our own family.

.

Primarily, my purpose in writing Living with Juvenile Arthritis: A Parent’s Guide was to provide valuable information and support to families dealing with rheumatic or autoimmune disease. While some of the information is very specific to JA, many topics and discussions covered in the book easily translate for other chronic childhood illnesses. Coping with grief, maintaining healthy family relationships, navigating the insurance system, how to perform effective medical Internet searches, securing a solid education despite medically related absences, and raising a well-adjusted child are all topics that parents of any chronically ill child could appreciate.

.

Living with Juvenile Arthritis can also be a tool to educate friends and family about the challenges our families are facing, a difficult concept to convey when our children often “don’t look sick.” Many outsiders don’t understand what we are going through and inadvertently say the wrong things, which can be incredibly hurtful when emotions are raw. As we were reeling from the gravity of our children’s diagnoses, the things that were said to us really threw us for a loop. I also wrote sections about what TO say and what NOT to say to give families a non-confrontational way to express these sentiments to those close to them. When extended family and friends have a true picture of what your family is facing, they can become a much better support system, which is essential for maintaining healthy relationships.

.

It is my hope that our experiences will help others chart their own paths with an easier route than we had when beginning this journey. I want to inspire you to maintain a positive attitude and retain the joy in your life despite this diagnosis, and to teach you to manage the day-to-day issues that come with the territory. My family has already been there, done that, and would love for you to benefit from our experiences.

.

Publication Date: September 3, 2013

.

Kimberly Poston Miller is the mother of two children who live with juvenile arthritis and other related autoimmune conditions. Through the management of her sons’ chronic illnesses, she has become not only an active and inspired advocate for arthritis awareness, but also a seasoned expert on finding and maintaining balance within a family that is beset by extreme circumstances and often overwhelming challenges. In her first book, Living with Juvenile Arthritis: A Parent’s Guide, Kimberly offers hard-earned wisdom seasoned with hope and encouragement to parents and caregivers of children with pediatric rheumatic conditions everywhere.

.

 

.


Not for Men Only

Not For Men Only

.

By Jessica Snyder with Elizabeth Jackson, MD

.

Women’s Heart Health is a vastly important topic, but unfortunately it’s not talked about nearly enough. Elizabeth Jackson, MD’s recently released book, An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health, addresses crucial information that you need in order to be your healthiest. She presents clear information from her perspective as a medical professional. We’ll be talking about heart disease in the female population and why the myth persists that heart disease is a man’s disease.

.

Not for Men Only
If you ask a woman what disease she fears most, chances are her answer will be “breast cancer.” While breast cancer affects many women, heart disease is actually the leading cause of death among women of all ages—taking the lives of six times as many women as breast cancer each year. In fact, heart attacks kill 267,000 American women annually, more than all forms of cancer combined. Further sobering is the fact that every year since 1984, heart attacks have killed more women in the United States than men.

.

Those statistics debunk the long-standing belief that heart disease is primarily a male health issue. For the first 80 years or so of the twentieth century, medical experts believed that estrogen provided women with lasting protection against heart disease and, consequently, focused their research on men. Estrogen does afford premenopausal women with a certain amount of defense, but by the age of 65, women “catch up” with men regarding cardiovascular problems. Furthermore, estrogen is not a magic shield—many women under the age of 65 develop heart disease. Of the approximately 435,000 American women who have heart attacks each year, 83,000 are under the age of 65, and 35,000 are under the age of 55. Women under the age of 50 who experience heart attacks are twice as likely as men to have fatal events.

.

Why is heart disease such a serious and growing threat among women? Unfortunately, there is still a sizable gap in knowledge. Though both research and awareness have increased, we still have a long way to go to educate women and healthcare professionals. Surveys show that awareness of heart attack warning signs is still low among women, especially minority women. In a 2009 study, only half of the women participating correctly identified pain in the neck, shoulders, or arms as potential symptoms of a heart attack.

.

This may explain why only 50 percent of women actually experiencing a heart attack call 911! More importantly, some reports suggest that women’s heart attack symptoms are ignored or misdiagnosed by many emergency and medical professionals.

.

Women are also less likely to discuss heart disease with their physicians. Dr. Jackson encourages women to include a discussion of your cardiac risk factors at every physical exam! And if you are experiencing or have experienced any early warning signs, seek medical attention immediately. Do not assume you’re too young, too healthy, or the wrong gender to have heart problems. If you experience warning signs, always ask “could it be my heart?”—even if you receive another diagnosis such as anxiety,heartburn, or muscle strain.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

 

.


Migraine & Headache Awareness Month

.

By Katherine Plumhoff

.

June is Migraine & Headache Awareness Month, and the National Headache Foundation is focusing on raising awareness for this chronic condition that affects 47 percent of adult Americans.

.

Headaches can manifest in multiple ways. Some headache suffers may see auras, which can include lines, dots, or flashing lights and signal the beginning of an oncoming headache. Changes in weather, certain foods, lack of sleep, certain hormones, and increased stress can trigger headaches, and no two headache sufferers have the same symptoms or experiences.

.

Although their manifestations differ greatly, the sensitive nervous systems that can lead to migraines are hereditary and often run in families.

.

There is no permanent cure for headaches, but there are multiple treatment options.

.

Dr. Gary E. Ruoff, MD, one of our authors here at Spry, has written a book about headaches and their management. The following excerpts from Knock Out Headaches will help you talk to your doctor, decide on a treatment plan, and follow through with it:

.

Prepare for the appointment with your doctor. Ruoff suggests keeping a “headache diary” that details your headache experiences for at least a month, and to also prepare detailed notes on your medical history. “The first appointment is more lengthy than normal, and it will delve into your medical, family, and headache history, as well as your medications and treatments, dietary and sleeping habits, and other relevant lifestyle information. You may also be asked to submit to certain lab tests,” says Dr. Ruoff.
Be thorough when describing your headaches. “It takes time and a great deal of listening to make an accurate diagnosis and develop a successful treatment plan for any patient, especially those who have become frustrated or disheartened by a chronic condition, such as headaches,” says Dr. Ruoff, so just keep talking. “Doctor and patient must communicate effectively and work as a team.”
Take an active role in your care. “No one knows your body as well as you … you are the best judge of what changes seem abnormal or when something feels ‘just not right.’ Don’t hesitate to follow your intuition,” says Dr. Ruoff.
Explore all options. Dr. Ruoff stresses non-medicinal ways to treat and prevent headaches. Before asking for a prescription, he suggests talking to your doctor about examining your sleep, exercise, posture/body alignment, and diet. If “you’ve followed the migraine prevention diet, reduced other avoidable triggers, and made some positive lifestyle changes—and you’re still plagued by persistent headaches—it may be time to consider migraine medication,” says Dr. Ruoff.
Keep the lines of communication open. “Ask questions about any aspect of your condition or treatment you don’t understand. Once you leave the office, keep your doctor informed of any problems, changes, side effects, or progress that occurs,” says Dr. Ruoff.
Be patient. “Migraines cannot be cured, but the condition can be managed. In fact, migraine is among the most successfully managed of all neurological disorders,” says Dr. Ruoff.

.

Whether you’ve been dealing with headaches all your life or you experience them only intermittently, consider talking to your doctor about your symptoms. The sooner you begin, the sooner you could find relief!

.
.

Katherine Plumhoff joined the Spry Wellness Blog as a contributor in 2013. She is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in English and Communication Studies at the University of Michigan and hopes to work in publishing after graduation.

.

 

.

.


Book Release: Dr. Elizabeth Jackson Helps Women Improve Heart Health at Any Age

Ageless_Woman_Cover_Web

.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Spry Publishing | p: 877-722-2264 | e: info@sprypub.com

.

Dr. Elizabeth Jackson Helps Women Improve Heart Health at Any Age
May 14, 2013, Ann Arbor

.

Spry Publishing and renowned cardiologist Elizabeth A. Jackson, MD, MPH, today announced the release of An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health: Your Path to Lifelong Wellness. With resources and tips to help women make positive steps toward improving their overall health, An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health is every woman’s guidebook to enjoying a heart-healthy life.

.

Heart disease has long been thought of as a men’s issue, though it is actually the leading cause of death in both men and women. While most published information on cardiovascular health addresses the topic from a male perspective, Dr. Jackson’s new book focuses exclusively on cutting-edge information that is relevant and impactful to women. An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health provides essential education on the differences between men and women when it comes to heart disease prevention, risk factors, symptoms, and treatments.

.

Often at the helm of their family’s overall health, diet, and nutrition, a woman and her lifestyle decisions can affect not only her own well-being; they can determine the habits of her partner and children as well. By becoming better educated, a woman can have a profound, permanent impact on the health of the people around her.

.

In a recent interview, Dr. Jackson discussed the inspiration behind writing her book. “Something that I feel particularly passionate about is our ability to improve our health on our own. When we look at exercise and nutrition and stress reduction it’s not like you need to have some pill that has side effects or that you need a medical person to help you through making a decision to take the pill. A lot of things we intuitively know how to do are important—eating healthy foods and being active and enjoying life have a tremendous ability to reduce your risk for heart disease.”

.

Dr. Jackson is currently available for interviews and appearances in support of the release of An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health. She is a knowledgeable and engaging interviewee who is qualified to comment on a wide range of women’s health topics, including:

.

- Cardiovascular health concerns that are unique to women; how heart health differs between women and men
- The impact of a woman’s health decisions on her family, friends, and others around her
- Improving heart health—and consequently, overall health and well-being—at any age
- Lifestyle considerations (diet, exercise, stress, sleep, etc.) and how they change throughout a woman’s life

.

To receive more information on Dr. Jackson and a review copy of her new book, An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health, please contact Jeremy Sterling, Director of Marketing at Spry Publishing, jsterling@sprypub.com.

.

About ELIZABETH A. JACKSON, MD, MPH
Elizabeth A. Jackson, MD, MPH, received her medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine. She completed her residency in internal medicine at Brown University’s Rhode Island Hospital and attended the New England Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, for a fellowship in cardiovascular medicine. She also completed a research fellowship in preventative medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. It was during her research fellowship that Dr. Jackson earned a Master’s in Public Health at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, where she also completed training in nutritional epidemiology.

.

Dr. Jackson began work at the University of Michigan Health Center in 2007. She works as an attending cardiologist with an emphasis in women’s cardiovascular health and cardiovascular prevention. Dr. Jackson is board certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease and is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology.

.

About SPRY PUBLISHING
Spry Publishing is a premier publisher of health books and media, offering valuable content on a wide range of medical subjects. With an extensive list of accredited authors, Spry Publishing specializes in educating both patients and healthcare professionals by delivering timely, relevant wellness information across an array of platforms.
Spry Publishing operates within the Edwards Brothers Malloy family of businesses, a century-old printing and publishing tradition that is currently the sixth largest book and journal manufacturer in North America.

.

For more information about Spry Publishing, Elizabeth Jackson, MD, MPH, An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health or the contents of this press release, please contact:
Jeremy Sterling, Director of Marketing
Spry Publishing, 2500 South State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104
p: 734-546-5434 | e: jsterling@sprypub.com
www.sprypub.com

.

 

.

 

.


Diabetes Management: What It Takes

9781938170102_Cover_FINAL

.

by Jessica Snyder and Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE

.
.

In his latest book, Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care, diabetes educator Gary Scheiner shares insider information on forthcoming, groundbreaking advancements in diabetes research, technology, and treatments. The following encouraging excerpt from Gary’s book gives you an idea about what it takes to manage diabetes.

.

“Improving your diabetes management is just that … doing better. Not perfect. Improvement requires the right attitude, education, and the ability to utilize the best tools and technologies the diabetes industry has to offer.

.

“Nothing, and I mean nothing, takes place without proper motivation. You could have the top doctor in the country and the best tools and training the world has to offer. Without the right mental approach, it’s all for naught.

.

“Exactly where does managing diabetes rank in your set of personal priorities? If your diabetes is not well controlled, how will it affect you at work? At school? At home? At the gym? In bed? Although nobody would expect you to place your diabetes self-care above the immediate well-being of your family, it should hold a prominent place in your life. So be prepared to invest some time, energy, and funds into your diabetes management.

.

“Persistence is another valuable trait. Over the course of your life with diabetes, there are sure to be many setbacks. Out-of-range readings. Undesired lab results. Lows at inappropriate times. And possibly the development of complications. When these things happen, it helps to live your diabetes life one day at a time. You can’t change the past, so don’t worry about what you did (or didn’t do) yesterday. And you certainly can’t live tomorrow until tomorrow. Every day represents an opportunity for a fresh start.

.

“The right mental approach also includes a degree of discipline, sticking to a plan even in the face of distraction and adversity. Maybe not all the time, but certainly most of the time. From my experience, people who are disciplined about things like keeping records, checking blood sugars, counting carbs, taking insulin before eating, and putting appropriate time frames between their meals and snacks (to avoid “grazing”) tend to have better blood sugar control over the long term.

.

“In terms of motivation, fear (of complications, for example) can be powerful, but it tends to be temporary. Long-term motivation stems from something personal that comes from within. Are you the type who is motivated by short-term challenges? Then play the numbers game and work on improving your control. Are you the type who will do things for others before you’ll do them for yourself? If that’s the case, serve as a role model for someone else or dedicate your diabetes self-care to someone special to you. Sometimes, motivation can come from a tangential goal, such as participating in an athletic event, having a baby, or simply being around long enough and healthy enough to dance at your grandkids’ weddings. Whatever your motivation, latch onto it and use it to fuel your daily choices and activities.”

.

As a Certified Diabetes Educator and person living with diabetes for more than 25 years, Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, has received numerous awards for his work in the fields of diabetes care and self-management teaching. Scheiner has written six books and hundreds of articles on various topics in diabetes wellness. Additionally, he teaches the art and science of blood glucose balancing to people throughout the world from his private practice in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, USA.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.
.

.


Take Heart: An Ageless Woman’s Guide Is Coming Soon

Ageless_Woman_Cover_Web

.

by Jess Snyder

.

We’re nearing the end of February and as you may have noticed, we’ve been celebrating American Heart Month with a series of heart-related posts here on the blog. Although heart disease has traditionally been considered primarily a men’s health issue, actually more women than men have died from heart complications over the past few decades. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women, not cancer as many people believe.

.

On May 7, Spry will release An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health: Your Path to Lifelong Wellness by renowned cardiologist Elizabeth A. Jackson, MD. The new book, written for women of all ages who are concerned with cardiovascular health, will provide an in-depth look at women’s heart issues from a female perspective. Dr. Jackson offers a wealth of valuable tips and resources aimed at helping you take manageable, positive steps toward understanding and improving your heart health.

.

Over the next few weeks, leading up to the book release, we’ll share more about Dr. Jackson with you and we’ll be featuring some of the helpful information contained in her book. Whether you’re younger or older, fit or ailing, it’s never too late to make changes that can lead you—and those you love—to a healthier heart.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

 

.


Meet Gary Scheiner – Part 2

by Jess Snyder

.

GaryScheiner2008-1280

.

Gary Scheiner MS, CDE has graciously agreed to share some of his thoughts about what trends he sees in his work as a Certified Diabetes Educator. His new book, Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care , is an invaluable guide to understanding recent advancements in the world of diabetes care. The book will be hitting stores on February 26. I talked with Gary recently about what motivated him to pursue a career in diabetes education, why he thinks this accurate information is essential for people with diabetes, and how things are changing (and why it’s important to keep up!). The following are a few of Gary’s answers from a longer article that we ran a few months ago called Meet Gary Scheiner .

JS: What made you want to do what you’re doing?

GS: Living with diabetes 24/7 and seeing others struggling with it give me the drive to be in this field. It certainly ain’t the money! Nobody is getting rich providing diabetes education.

I’ve had type 1 diabetes since I was 18 … I was actually diagnosed in SUGARLAND, Texas (the irony is unbelievable). I use an insulin pump, CGM, and take Amylin/GLP-1 to manage hunger and post-meal spikes. My control isn’t always the greatest, but I do the best I can.

JS: Why did you feel you had to share the information in your book?

GS: Far too many people with diabetes are, shall we say, “underserved” by their healthcare providers. Many physicians are not up to speed on the latest technologies and are intimidated by them. As a result, their patients are not exposed to devices and techniques that could be benefitting them greatly.

JS: What tips or advice would you share with your readers?

GS: New medications, technologies, and techniques are useless unless you have the self-management skills to utilize them effectively. Take the time to work with diabetes educators on honing your skills and using the latest tools to achieve the best possible control.

JS: How important is it that a person with diabetes keeps up with technology?

GS: It is important, simply because it makes our lives (and I say “our” because I have diabetes as well) easier and our control better. However, technology without proper education and motivation to use it optimally is a grand waste of time.

JS: How have concepts of blood glucose management changed?

GS: We no longer need to mold a person’s lifestyle around their insulin program. We now mold the insulin program around the chosen lifestyle. PWDs can do just about anything they choose to do, as long as they have the tools and insight to match their insulin to the situation.

JS: What trends are you seeing in CGMs and other management technologies right now? Do you think they will last?

GS: The comfort, accuracy, and ease of use continue to improve with each newly released system. But more importantly, third-party payers are accepting this technology and are much more willing to cover the costs. Without coverage, CGM and other technologies would go nowhere.

Read the full interview here.

.

As a Certified Diabetes Educator and person living with diabetes for more than 25 years, Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, has received numerous awards for his work in the fields of diabetes care and self-management teaching. Scheiner has written six books and hundreds of articles on various topics in diabetes wellness. Additionally, he teaches the art and science of blood glucose balancing to people throughout the world from his private practice in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, USA.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

.


Diabetes Tips from Gary Scheiner’s New Book

by Jess Snyder and Gary Scheiner

.

.

We here at Spry are very excited to announce our newest book, Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE .

.

As Gary says, “This book is all about keeping pace with the changes—changing technology, changing therapies, changing approaches to diabetes management. Basically, the information provided here will help you take advantage of what’s ‘new and improved,’ and ultimately make your diabetes control a little bit better and living with this chronic condition a little bit easier. My personal goal, and what I emphasize to my patients, is to take the best possible care of their diabetes here and now. When a cure does finally come along—and it will—I want to be in the best of health and have no regrets about the effort I put in.”

.

To celebrate this upcoming book, we will be releasing a series of ‘DTips’ over the next few weeks. We’ll share short bits of useful information with you on the future of diabetes, excerpted from the pages of Until There Is a Cure. Watch for #DTips on Twitter and don’t miss the next one!

.

Gary Scheiner’s Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care releases on February 26, 2013. Preorder your copy now!

.

After earning a Master of Science in Exercise Physiology, Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, received his diabetes training at the Joslin Diabetes Center. As a Certified Diabetes Educator and person living with diabetes for more than 25 years, he has received numerous awards for his work in the fields of diabetes care and self-management teaching.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

.


A Valentine’s Day Heart Health Reminder

by Jess Snyder

.

.

Even though it’s Valentine’s Day—a day to indulge yourself by spending time with your loved ones, having a few chocolates, and maybe even a romantic dinner for two—it’s also an important day to stop and think about keeping yourself and your dear ones as healthy as possible, especially with regard to heart health. Here are 5 quick activities that could help you stay in tip-top shape for many Valentine’s Days to come.

.

Watch the salt! Most of us (and I mean the vast majority of us) are eating more salt than we should be by about 1,000 mg each day. Much of that salt comes from processed foods such as bread, deli meat, and pre-made dinners. Try eating fewer processed foods as a way to cut your sodium intake back a bit.

.

Count your drinks. Some alcohol, like red wine, has flavonoids in it, which can be anti-inflammatory and a decent excuse to have a glass, if you’d like to have one. Many doctors recommend 1 glass a day for women and 2 for men. However, too much alcohol can negatively affect your heart muscles, and it’s very easy to consume more calories than you realize in liquids. So, think before you drink!

.

Take a hike. No, really. Even a 30-minute walk each day can help to burn more calories and work out your heart. Some studies have shown that women who exercise regularly reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease by as much as 30 to 40 percent. Taking a family walk can also be a great idea if you have a spouse, parent, children, nieces, nephews, or grandchildren who could also use the exercise (and the quality time!). Walking can be a wonderful way to calm down and think, which leads me to my next point …

.

Chill out. Though the link between chronic stress and heart disease is unclear and still being researched, stress can definitely lead to other unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as drinking, emotional eating, smoking, or depression. By working to reduce your stress, you might find it easier to eliminate some of these other unhealthy habits, too.

.

Know when it’s serious. Everyone should be aware of the warning signs of a heart attack, whether it’s for their own benefit or to be supportive of someone for whom they care. The sooner a heart attack is recognized, the more efficient medication and treatment will be, which can mean that lives may be prolonged and saved. The most common signs of a heart attack are the ones many people are familiar with: chest and upper body discomfort, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea. However, women also need to be aware that many women won’t experience the characteristic chest pain if they have a heart attack. And as many as 75 percent of women may have symptoms similar to the flu for the week leading up to their heart attack. Be aware—if something doesn’t seem right, seek medical attention immediately.

.

Hopefully these tips aren’t too painful, and maybe they’re a part of your lifestyle already. Keep up the hard work, and set yourself up for a happy heart.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

.


First Peek at “Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care”

by Jess Snyder

.

Gary Scheiner BW Web

.

Gary Scheiner MS, CDE , knows a thing or two about diabetes. Not only has he managed his own type 1 diabetes for more than 20 years, but he has also devoted his life and career as a Certified Diabetes Educator to educating and empowering others living with diabetes, helping them to truly understand their conditions and their treatment options. He is tremendously skilled at taking difficult medical concepts and communicating them in a way that virtually anyone can understand—an important, if not crucial, qualification in Gary’s line of work.

.

Gary’s widely read books are staples in any serious diabetes library, with his Think Like a Pancreas frequently topping best-seller lists and adorning the bookshelves of both patients with diabetes and health-care professionals everywhere.

.

In his newest book, Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care , Gary shares insider information on forthcoming, groundbreaking advancements in diabetes research, technology, and treatments. The following excerpt captures Gary’s enthusiasm for helping people with diabetes and explains some of his overall concept behind writing the book.

.

I never used to believe in that saying, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” Then I entered the diabetes field.

.

This book is all about keeping pace with the changes—changing technology, changing therapies, changing approaches to diabetes management. Basically, the information provided here will help you take advantage of what’s “new and improved,” and ultimately make your diabetes control a little bit better and living with this chronic condition a little bit easier.

.

With changes taking place all around us, what exactly has stayed the same? For starters, the goal of diabetes management is roughly the same: to manage blood sugar as effectively as possible so that it does not keep us from enjoying life to the fullest. The emphasis on self-management hasn’t really changed. Experts recognize that diabetes is the type of condition that involves countless choices and decisions on the part of the patient on a daily basis. To expect your doctor or nurse to be there all the time is a pipedream. We, as people with diabetes, must educate ourselves and obtain and use the necessary tools to manage effectively.

.

One other constant through the years is hope. We all hope that doing the right things will produce the desired results. We also hope for a cure. Back in 1985 when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in a Texas town called Sugarland (God’s honest truth!), my endocrinologist tried to convince me how lucky I was to be diagnosed when I was.

.

“We’ve come a long way in recent years,” he said. “The way research is going, in five or ten years, your diabetes will probably be cured.”

.

That was more than 25 years ago. Still no cure, but people are still saying, “In 5 or 10 years … we’ll have a cure.” Although there is some very promising research taking place, I’m not one to put my eggs in that basket. My personal goal, and what I emphasize to my patients, is to take the best possible care of their diabetes here and now. When a cure does finally come along—and it will—I want to be in the best of health and have no regrets about the effort I put in.

.

Today, I can look back at the way diabetes was treated when I was diagnosed and say, “Man, those were the Stone Ages!” But you know what? Five or ten years from now, I’ll probably look back to today and think the very same thing. At least I hope so.

.

Gary Scheiner’s Until There Is a Cure: The Latest and Greatest in Diabetes Self-Care releases on February 26, 2013. Preorder your copy now!

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

.


National Wear Red Day

by Jess Snyder

.

.

Ladies, there’s just something about wearing the color red. It gives you an extra lift and helps you feel a little more confident. Maybe that’s why the American Heart Association chose red to represent their awareness campaign for women’s heart disease.

.

Go Red For Women is a campaign with the purpose of educating women about the realities of heart disease and how it is the number one killer of women in the United States today. The campaign was started in 2004, a year after the first National Wear Red Day was hosted by the American Heart Association to educate and empower women about their heart health by providing tools to help women take action to improve their well-being. Every year on the first Friday in February, women (and men) don red dresses, sweaters, blazers, T-shirts, jackets, and anything else you can imagine to make a statement about their commitment to fighting heart disease and educating women about its risks. Funds raised on National Wear Red Day help to supply up-to-date educational programs, research, and support materials specifically designed to teach women about the risks of heart disease.

.

The first National Wear Red Day happened ten years ago, and in the past decade there have been some tremendous improvements in women’s heart health to celebrate! Fewer women (21%) are dying from heart disease and more women (23%) are aware that heart disease is their number one health threat.

.

So get out there this February. Whether you organize a parade, put together a group of friends to do a fundraising campaign, or proudly don your favorite red heels, it all adds up to increasing awareness and saving lives.

.

To learn more about the impacts of heart disease on women and what you can do about it, check out An Ageless Woman’s Guide to Heart Health by Dr. Elizabeth Jackson.

.

Jessica Snyder is a member of the Publicity and Marketing Department at Spry Publishing. In 2012, she contributed to the Spry Publishing blog while working part-time.

.

.